Trail Conditions

From Rocky Mountain National Park:

These Trail Conditions reports are the viewpoints of the submitters, whether park staff, volunteers, or visitors. Conditions can change rapidly in the mountains. Use these reports only as guidelines. Be prepared for varying weather and trail conditions.

Spring Conditions
With a recent major snowfall, trail conditions have changed, and all park trails are currently snow-covered, as of 5/19/2017. Spring is a spectacular time to visit the wilderness of Rocky Mountain National Park, but weather conditions change rapidly. Know before you go! Be sure to layer up with insulating, waterproof clothing, wear sunglasses, use sunscreen and carry water. We really want your trip to be both safe and enjoyable.

5/22/2017
Bear Lake to Lake Haiyah
Hikers sinking significantly with snowshoes. Snow 4 ft. deep in places. Unable to make it to the lake because of the deep snow.
Visitor

5/21/2017
Cub Lake Trail
Wet, no snowshoes required, road is clear. Hiking poles and boots recommended.
Visitor

5/20/2017
Current backcountry conditions
Heavy snowfall 5/17-5/18 impacted all trails and backcountry campsites in the park. Until meltout, all predictions of snow free dates are unreliable. Backcountry site reservations for 5/19, 5/20, and 5/21 were cancelled because of avalanche danger, downed trees, and other hazardous conditions in the park.

For Your Safety

These Trail Conditions reports are the viewpoints of the submitters, whether park staff, volunteers, or visitors. Conditions can change rapidly in the mountains. Use these reports only as guidelines. Be prepared for varying weather and trail conditions.

Falling trees are ever-present hazards when traveling in the forest. Be aware of your surroundings. Dead trees can fall without warning!

Due to the September 2013 Flood, missing foot bridges, uneven trail surfaces, unstable slopes, falling trees due to soil moisture, rutted trails, damaged water bars and steps, standing water, difficult water crossings, and missing directional signs could be encountered. Most of Rocky Mountain National Park is designated wilderness, where self-reliance and adventure are expected. Hikers should be prepared to take responsibility for their own actions; search and rescue may be delayed. Be prepared to stay overnight even if you are a day hiker. Hiking poles may be helpful on uneven trails. Route finding skills may be required. Carry a map and compass and other backcountry travel essentials. Hike at your own risk.